Articles

'Bubble Boys' Cured in Medical Breakthrough Using Gene Therapy

An experimental gene therapy has cured eight infants with the so-called Bubble Boy Disease, an immune-system deficiency so severe that children with it were at one time kept in total isolation for fear that even a simple common cold could be deadly. 

In a major scientific breakthrough, researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis have developed a one-time, personalized treatment used to correct the genetic defect and build fully functioning immune systems in infants with the condition, formally known as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, or SCID. 

How Not to Get Sued

As a forensic pathologist and an expert at what kills people, I am frequently consulted by attorneys when a patient dies from a medical misdiagnosis or a therapeutic complication. Medical malpractice cases are contentious and drag on, sometimes taking years to resolve. The lawyers often know just as much medicine as the doctors -- and they do their homework, challenging my expertise and knowledge base with the goal of tripping me up until I concede something that will help them win. I have the advantage of coming in as an expert witness, an outside doctor who 

Top 5 foods for hair growth

Diet plays an important role in keeping the skin and hair healthy. The foods people eat have an impact on the growth, strength, and volume of their hair.

Hair grows from the roots, so the key to healthy hair growth lies in improving the health of the scalp and hair follicles.

This article looks at the best foods and nutrients to promote hair growth.

Self-Care is a 'Necessity' for Doctors, Expert Says

PHILADELPHIA -- Physicians need to remember that self-care is a necessity, not just a luxury, Richard Wardrop III, MD, PhD, said here at the American College of Physicians (ACP) annual meeting.

"The way I think about this is -- you've got to put your mask on first," just like flight attendants tell you before an airplane flight, said Wardrop, who is vice-chair of medicine at the University of Mississippi in Jackson, and a member of the ACP Physician Wellness Task Force. "You've got to take care of yourself before you take care of somebody else."

Healthy hearts need two proteins working together

Two proteins that bind to stress hormones work together to maintain a healthy heart in mice, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. These proteins, stress hormone receptors known as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), act in concert to help support heart health. When the signaling between the two receptors is out of balance, the mice have heart disease.